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Media Theory Revision Guide

All A level theorists covered alongside revision summaries and exam practise exercises.

 

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Humans

Humans: audience/producer convergence

Jenkins

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Jenkins tells us that contemporary fan engagement evidences the convergence of audiences and producers. 


Digital technologies, Jenkins argues, have led to an exponential increase in fan activity - with new digital tools enabling fans to connect more easily and over geographical distances that would have been impossible pre web 2.0.


Digital technologies have given fans an ever-wider range of tools to express their love of TV products with fans contributing digital art and video remixes as a means to express their love of content.


Importantly, Jenkins argues that this explosion in fan-related activity has resulted in a profound shift in audience/producers relations - with traditional content creators now actively encouraging audiences to engage in fan activity for the purposes of economic benefits.


Clearly, Humans used an innovative array of marketing activities that were designed to cultivate fans as a means to provide digital labour. Guerilla marketing stunts in the form of a mocked-up Synethetica Persona storefront in Regent Street created audience visibility, while transmedia storytelling took place in the form of the Synthetica Persona product recall on a fake website.


Such activities, importantly, were designed as shareable experiences that fans could repost on their own social networks - thuis creating valuable publicity for this new show.

Web 2.0

Jenkins refers to Web 2.0 as the commercial activities of the internet - web marketing, for example.

Media terminology used

Media flow

Refers to the distribution of professional media products using the digital networks of audiences. Fans, for example, might call attention to a product by 'liking' or 'reposting' content.

Fan labour

The work (often free of charge) executed by fans and audiences that helps media makers to distribute and/or market their output.

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